Cunningham, Chernicoff & Warshawsky, P.C.

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As of May 29, 2020, Dauphin County, where our office is located, has moved from Red to Yellow status. Our office will re-open on June 1, 2020. Until further notice, Stay Safe Guidelines will be followed, including safe social distancing (6 feet), cleaning after each client and the wearing of masks by employees and clients at all times while in our office. People who are ill and those without masks will not be permitted entry into our office.

3 things to look for when choosing the executor of your estate

Many people do not like to think about when they die. But sometimes it is necessary to do so to ensure that their estate and loved ones remain financially protected. Estate planning is an excellent tool for you to use to plan for your family’s well-being after your death. To prepare, you need to do more than write down a list of instructions for everyone to follow and label it your last will and testament. You need to choose the right person to act as your executor. To avoid complications that can lead to disputes and a lengthy probate process, you should take the following factors into consideration when choosing an executor.

1. Can remain neutral

Things tend to become complicated when a loved one dies and leaves behind a will or an estate. Family members who once were friendly may become hostile and confrontational. You cannot predict how well your family will respond to your death and your estate plans after you die. Therefore, you should choose an executor who will treat the responsibility as a business agreement and remain neutral and calm in the face of conflict. Such professionalism can help keep negative situations and disputes from escalating further and affecting your estate.

2. Handles responsibility well

Managing an estate is no easy matter. You should choose a person who is available and can remain organized to do what is necessary to settle your estate. Seek the type of individual who tackles responsibility head on instead of waiting until the last minute to get things done. Your executor should also have the time to put your affairs first so that important deadlines are kept.

3. Honors and respects your final wishes

Everyone may not agree with your final wishes. By creating estate plans, you can ensure that you control what happens to your property and assets when you die, not the state or anyone else. Anyone you choose as your executor should not have any problems following the instructions you leave behind. He should continue to abide by them even if he does not personally agree with them.

Choosing the right person to control your estate when you die is not always easy. If you need assistance designating an executor and delegating his responsibilities, you should speak with an attorney about the situation for guidance.